6 Best Frog Bass Lures: Catch More Bass In 2020

BEST OVERALL

Livetarget Hollow Body Frog

4.5/5

BEST TOPWATER FROG

BOOYAH Poppin’ Pad Crasher

4.5/5

BEST LIFELIKE FROG

Lunkerhunt Lunker Frog

4.3/5

As bass anglers, there’s one thing that we love, and that’s weedy, mucky, sloppy backroad ponds in the middle of nowhere. This is where the best bass fishing is, and to fish this type of water, you need the best bass frog lure.

Frog type baits work great on weed mats because they don’t have an exposed hook, and they glide right over the weeds and work their way through the slop with a beautiful presentation. These are towards the top when it comes to the best topwater lures when fishing in vegetated water, but that doesn’t mean you’re only limited to that. You can lure the best frog baits in deep water and around structure as well. Below are our best frogs for bass fishing.

Here’s The Best Frog Lures For Bass Backed By 18+ Hours Of Research

Livetarget Hollow Body Frog

BEST OVERALL

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The most important thing you’re looking for in the best frog lure is the fact that it can glide through the weeds and jump around the lily pads, and you’ll have no problem doing that with this one.

BOOYAH Poppin’ Pad Crasher

BEST TOPWATER FROG

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One of my favorite things about frog lures for bass is how realistic they look as they move through the water. These are about as real as it gets, the patterns, the colors, and the presentation are just about perfect.

Lunkerhunt Lunker Frog

BEST LIFELIKE FROG

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If you thought it couldn’t get any more real than some of the frog baits we’ve shared so far, you’re wrong. This one is incredibly realistic, and my favorite thing about it is the legs. I’ve never seen a fishing lure move with such accurate precision, so these are the cream of the crop in terms of appearance.

River2Sea Spittin Wa Frog

BEST TOPWATER POPPER

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The main difference between this lure and the rest is the cup on the front. When you cast this into the water, it makes a loud pop sound, and it continues to do that as you retrieve it. As a result, you wouldn’t fish this in the slop because you wouldn’t get the sound you want.

Croch Hollow Frog 18 Pack

BEST FROG MULTI-PACK

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The biggest problem I have with these is their appearance. I find that they look a bit too shiny, which gives them the appearance of being cheap soft plastic, but that’s a sacrifice you make when you buy an 18 pack of lures. Overall, not bad, though, and worth the purchase!

Berkley PowerBait Tree Frog

BEST SOFT FROG FOR BASS

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I’m a big fan of powerbait, and these frogs do a great job of scouting the water and seeing what is out there. I would suggest taking one these and rigging it down the rear and simply moving through the vegetation and see what happens.

Different Types of Frog Lures

Frog Lures

When it comes to fishing frogs for bass, you’re limited to two different types. You’ve got standard skirting frogs that will navigate through the weediest bodies of water, and these come in both hollow bodies and soft bodies. You also have poppers that you’ll want to reserve more for open topwater fishing.

Let’s break down each style, so you understand them.

These don’t have a bend at the top, and they work well for heavy cover conditions because they don’t have that snag area where you’ll take weeds with you.

Hollow Body Frogs

These frogs are essentially what they sound like. These frogs have a soft rubber mold made into the shape of a frog, and they usually have two hooks wrapped around the rear of the lure, pointing towards the front.

They’re designed this way because they’re meant to be weedless. This means you can run through the sloppiest of water without catching and bringing a ton of weeds with you.

When you try to fish other types of lures like spinnerbaits, crankbaits, or jigs in heavy vegetation, you grab a ton of slop and pull it. This not only makes you wonder if there’s a fish at the end, but it completely screws up your presentation and ensures that a fish will never bite.

Much of the time, hollow body frogs will also come with realistic lifelike legs like some of the ones we looked at previously. These are great because they provide a natural motion and look exactly like a frog would if it was moving through the water.

Soft Body Frogs

These are usually weedless as well, but instead of realistic legs, they come with two skirts at the end, which intend on mimicking the legs. They look more like a tail, and they create a lot of noise in the water, which is what entices the bass to bite. You’ll find that a lot of crankbaits and topwater poppers will also take on this appearance, so you want to make sure you have the right lure.

One way you can always tell a soft body frog from a crankbait is by the weight. These are topwater lures that rely entirely on you to create the presentation, so they’re always light. Most frog lures won’t even weigh in at one ounce, and crankbaits are much heavier so they can dive into the water.

Frog Poppers

Frog Poppers

If you want to diversify your tackle box, you’ll want to keep a few of these in there as well. You might find that the once weed-ridden lake you like to fish has cleared up a bit, or the water levels have risen, and now you’re not dealing with as much heavy cover. When this happens, you can switch over to your poppers and enjoy a feeding frenzy.

The big difference between poppers and traditional frogs is the noise they make and the fishing application. These are not weedless, and they usually have a hook that sticks right out, so you don’t want to fish them in sloppy water.

Instead, you’ll want to fish frog poppers in open water because they make a loud pop sound when they hit the water, and they create a bubble trail behind as you retrieve them. If you’re rolling through a ton of pads and other green, you won’t be able to develop the right presentation, and chances are you’ll come back with nothing more than a hook full of crap.

Best Bass Frog Lure Colors

Choosing the right frog color for bass is simple, and I always stick to the same story no matter what type of lure you’re using. First, you want to mimic your surroundings. If you can see some frogs around or if you’re familiar with the area, you want to choose colors that look like the frogs around you.

Second, pay attention to the season and remember that these types of lures work best in the dead of summer when it’s hot. Fall and winter fishing require some different strategies. That said, choose a color that mimics the day around you. If it’s cloudy and overcast, the bass are probably feeling “cloudy” as well, so they’re not into striking hard and chasing the lure very far. Go with something a bit smaller and more neutral in color.

If it’s a hot July morning and it’s already 75-80 degrees, and the sun is beating down on you, chances are the bass are feeding heavily. When this happens, you want to entice them as much as you can. Use a bright color and make as much noise as you can with the lure to get them going.

How to Fish a Frog Bait

How to Fish a Frog Bait

Let’s recap for a quick second. Now you know what frog lures to choose, how to decide between the options, and what colors to pick. Finally, we need to talk about some of the actionable things you can do on the water to have success.

The Muckier The Better

Bass feed on slimy stuff in mucky areas, so this is where you want to go with frog fishing. One thing that takes a bit of time to get used to is the fact that you’re fishing with an entirely weedless lure. I always have a bit of skepticism in my mind when I cast directly into the areas I would normally avoid. Just do it with these because you’ll be glad you did!

If you’ve ever been kayak fishing, you likely carry a few frogs with you. Kayaks help you get into the places where you might not reach with a boat. 

Once you cast, give it a few seconds to sit there, but don’t wait too long because the bass will inspect it too much. You may even get a strike the second it hits the water if you put the lure in the right location.

Remember that frogs move in burst motions, so you want to create the same presentation with your lure. Retrieve in with one or two full revolutions of the reel, then pause. Repeat this process over and over, and you’ll have no problem finding bass in the slop. Having a smooth reel helps with this.

Wood Works Too

Another popular area I like fishing with topwater frog lures is around fallen logs and trees. I will cast perpendicular and retrieve right along the log, and this works almost every time. You can also do this with a popper as long as the water is somewhat clear, and you’ll have the same impact as you would with a buzzbait. This works like a charm.

The main advantage you have with a frog is the fact that they don’t sink. A buzzbait will continue dropping, so you’ll have to consistently retrieve it, but a frog will stay in place until you do something with it.

Final Thoughts

It’s easy to choose the best frogs for bass when you put in your research and understand what you’re looking at. A lot of people see lures like this and think they’re unnecessary or they don’t work, but the problem is, they don’t understand how to use them.

These lures are the best in heavy vegetation, and there isn’t anything out there that can compare. If you’re looking to have something in your back pocket for those hot summer mornings when the bass are feeding in the slop, this is the route to go! Thanks for reading!

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